Did You Know? 8 Interesting Facts About Bones

Posted in Orthopedics on Thursday, 19 November 2015

The skeletal system in the human body is made of bones, tendons and ligaments, all of which are necessary for our body structure, movement and to protect our internal organs. We usually tend to take our bones for granted until one is injured, broken or they become brittle from old age. Here are few interesting facts regarding bones.

Tags bone, osteoporosis

Foot & Ankle Reconstruction Returns Skier to the Slopes Decades After Devastating Injury

Posted in What's New, Glenview Division, Patient Stories, Move Better Blog on Thursday, 05 November 2015

In early 1964, Cathy Smithers was an aspiring Olympian, skiing the slopes of Vermont with a close-knit group of friends who trained together. Her specialties were slalom, giant slalom and downhill. “I had a reputation of being the girl that everybody wanted to beat, including the boys, and it was really fun when I beat them!” Cathy recalls. On a practice run that February, she straddled the last gate of a slalom course and went down hard. She shattered both the tibia and fibula of her right leg.

After six weeks in traction, she was released from the hospital. The accident and subsequent skeletal traction and casting left her with tendon and ligament damage and a claw foot. Never one to back down from a challenge, Cathy was determined to ski again. A few years later, she joined her Olympics-bound friends in New Hampshire and skied a couple of runs. Not realizing she was skiing off balance due to her earlier injury, she fell again and re-fractured both bones. At the age of 19, she was told by her doctors that if she ever broke her leg again, she would never walk again. She was forced to give up skiing and her Olympic dreams.

Tags Dr. Steven L. Haddad, Cathy Smithers, Foot & Ankle Reconstruction

Different Types of Shoulder Arthritis and Symptoms

Posted in Orthopedics on Wednesday, 28 October 2015

Arthritis generally describes joint inflammation either from direct trauma injuries, medical illnesses, or regular wear and tear of an active lifestyle. There are over 100 variations of arthritis which can affect an individual in different parts of the body, and the shoulder is susceptible to different types of arthritis.

Although there are different types of arthritis of the shoulder, they all have some common symptoms such as joint pain in the shoulder, swelling and with time it will eventually limit range of movement.

Here are five distinctive forms of shoulder arthritis:

Tags osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Post-Traumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Arthropathy

Spinal Problems That May Cause Foot Pain

Posted in Orthopedics on Thursday, 15 October 2015

Foot pain is more often a result of injury, wearing ill-fitting shoes or physical issues within the foot, such as tendonitis, arthritis or bursitis. However, in some cases pain in your foot may be linked to problems in your spine. There are some revealing signs of foot pain caused by a problem in your spine, such as your foot feeling heavy, difficulty raising your foot up, leg pain, numbness, weakness and problem walking on your tiptoes.

Studies have shown that spinal dysfunction, like a narrowing of the spinal canal or spinal stenosis, pinches and squeezes on the spinal nerves in your lower back causing leg pain that radiates down to your feet.

Tags herniated discs, spinal stenosis, back pain

IBJI, Local Schools Joining Forces to Protect, Educate Young Athletes about Head Injuries

Posted in What's New, In the News, Community Involvement, Glenview Division on Friday, 02 October 2015

A new law called the Youth Sports Concussion Safety Act took effect this fall. It is designed to better protect students enrolled in Illinois public and private schools who suffer concussions. In the event of a head injury, the law requires that students be evaluated by a physician or licensed athletic trainer. Following such evaluation, students must also get written consent from a physician or from an athletic trainer working under a physician’s supervision before they can return to play or to the classroom. The new law also requires schools to establish concussion oversight teams responsible for implementing return-to-play and return-to-learn protocols and policies.

Tags Our Lady of Perpetual Help, OLPH, Youth Sports Concussion Safety Act, Baseline Concussion Testing

50 Years of Scoliosis Research – What We’ve Learned

Posted in What's New, In the News, Orthopedic News, Morton Grove Division on Tuesday, 29 September 2015


Steven M. Mardjetko, MD

When members of the Scoliosis Research Society gather this fall to observe the 50th anniversary of the renowned organization’s founding, one of IBJI’s experts will be on hand for the celebration. Steven Mardjetko, MD, is among the most highly regarded physicians in the world when it comes to scoliosis research, treatment and innovation. Dr. Mardjetko has been treating pediatric patients with spinal deformities since the 1980s. Over that time, he has witnessed and been part of some extraordinary advances in terms of how pediatric spine specialists diagnose, evaluate, and treat scoliosis and other pediatric spinal deformities. Below are some of the key developments in scoliosis knowledge from a recent interview with Dr. Mardjetko.


#1 - We now have definitive proof that bracing is effective.
The use of braces to correct abnormal spine shape has shifted in and out of favor over the past 50 years. Back in the 1970s, braces were standard treatment protocol for children and adolescents with spinal deformities like scoliosis. Questions arose, however, about the efficacy of brace treatment in the 1980s and some physicians stopped advising patients to use them, opting instead for surgical intervention. According to Dr. Mardjetko, bracing has now been rigorously researched and evaluated. Key research findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine confirm that bracing significantly decreases the progression of high-risk curves to the threshold for surgery in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. (Weinstein, M.D. Stuart L., et al. “Effects of Bracing in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis.” New England Journal of Medicine 369:1512-1521 (2013). Dolan, Ph.D., Lori A., et al) “Bracing works,” says Dr. Mardjetko, “and it frequently eliminates the need for surgery.”

Tags scoliosis, Scoliosis Research Society, Spinal Deformity, Dr. Steven Mardjetko, MAGEC spinal growth rod system

IBJI’s Dr. Ritesh Shah Publishes His First Book

Posted in What's New, In the News, Orthopedic News, Morton Grove Division on Friday, 25 September 2015


Ritesh R. Shah, MD

Pocket Orthopaedic Surgery Is Comprehensive Reference Guide for Health Care Professionals

IBJI is pleased to announce that one of its own, Ritesh Shah, MD , has published his first book. The book, Pocket Orthopaedic Surgery, was released earlier this month by Wolters Kluwer Health, a leading provider of information for professionals and students in medicine, nursing, allied health and pharmacy.
Dr. Shah’s book is described by Wolters Kluwer Health as the “go-to resource for the essential orthopaedic information you need in a high-yield, easy-to-use format. Concise and well organized … this pocket-sized powerhouse delivers highly relevant orthopaedic coverage in an easily portable source, making reference quick and easy.”

The idea for the book came to Shah when he was a surgical resident at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Like many physicians, Dr. Shah was familiar with Pocket Medicine, an internal medicine handbook that is widely used by medical professionals. Dr. Shah thought that a similar book on orthopaedic surgery would be helpful for his fellow surgery residents and for a host of other health care professionals including family practice doctors, sports medicine doctors and physical therapists who see patients with orthopaedic issues.

Tags Dr. Ritesh Shah, Pocket Orthopaedic Surgery Book

Bulging Disc Injury Recovery: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment

Posted in Orthopedics on Thursday, 24 September 2015

A bulging disc or slipped disc is a common spinal column injury in the intervertebral disc due to neck/ back trauma or age related injury. It can occur in your lumbar spine (lower back), thoracic spine (upper and mid-back) or your cervical spine (neck). The intervertebral disc is weakened so much that it protrudes into the spinal canal either in the neck referred to as a cervical bulging disc, mid-back known as thoracic bulging disc or lower back identified as lumbar bulging disc. The bulge pinches nerve roots along the spinal cord to put additional pressure on the surrounding nerve tissue. Along with back pain and spasms, the signs you should watch out for are tingling and numbness that spread along the upper and lower extremities.

Tags neck pain, Bulging Disc , back pain

Choosing the Medicare Plan That’s Right for You

Posted in What's New, In the News, Orthopedic News, Arlington Heights Division, Bannockburn Division, Chicago Division, Gurnee Division, Glenview Division, Libertyville Division, Morton Grove Division on Monday, 21 September 2015

It’s estimated that 10,000 Baby Boomers turn 65 and become Medicare-eligible on any given day. The rules concerning how to enroll in Medicare, however, can be confusing. People who are newly eligible typically have lots of questions. Will I need a referral to see a specialist? Is there a cap on what my annual out-of-pocket expenses may be? Can I get prescription drug coverage under my Medicare plan? It’s critical to get those questions answered and understand the differences between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plans because the consequences can be significant if you choose the wrong kind of coverage.

The Medicare Rights Center outlines the key differences between Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage Plans in an easy to understand format. To learn more visit http://www.medicareinteractive.org or download the Medicare Rights Summary Flier.

Tags Medicare, Medicare Advantage

5 Common Causes Of A Stiff Neck

Posted in Orthopedics on Thursday, 17 September 2015

A stiff neck may last a few days or even weeks but it usually heals quickly because of the durability of the cervical spine. Sometimes, something as simple as sleeping wrong can cause a stiff neck and occasionally a stiff neck can have more serious implications.  

These are the usual culprits that can lead to a stiff neck:

Tags neck pain

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