Alan C. League, MD
Alejandra Rodriguez-Paez, MD
Alexander Gordon, MD
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Anand Vora, MD
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Anthony Savino, MD
Ari Kaz, MD
Brian Clay, MD
Brian Donahue, MD
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Charles M. Lieder, DO
Charles Slack, MD
Chinyoung Park, MD
Christ Pavlatos, MD
Christian Skjong, MD
Craig Cummins, MD
Craig Phillips, MD
Craig S. Williams, MD
Craig Westin, MD
Daniel Newman, MD
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David H. Garelick, MD
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Edward J. Logue, MD
Eric Chehab, MD
Garo Emerzian, DPM
Gary Shapiro, MD
Gerald Eisenberg, MD
Gregory Brebach, MD
Gregory Portland, MD
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Home |  Blog |  Understanding Osteoporosis – “A Silent Disease”

Understanding Osteoporosis – “A Silent Disease”

We finish up World Bone & Joint Awareness Month by focusing on Osteoporosis, a medical condition meaning “porous bone” in which bones become brittle and fragile from loss of tissue, typically as a result of hormonal changes, lack of calcium or vitamin D.

Osteoporosis is very common – approximately 54 million Americans suffer from it. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, roughly one in two women and one in four men, age 50 and older, will break a bone due to osteoporosis. These broken bones usually occur in the hip, spine and wrist.
Historically, women of Caucasian and Asian decent have been the most susceptible to developing Osteoporosis, but the condition is affecting more and more men at an increasing rate. In fact, one-third of all hip fractures worldwide occur in men and by 2050, it is projected that over 900 million men age 60 and older will have the condition.

Osteoporosis is often called a silent disease because you can’t feel your bones getting weaker. Breaking a bone is often the first sign that you have Osteoporosis, or you may notice that you are getting shorter or your upper back is curving forward.

A Bone Density Test (DXA) can diagnose osteoporosis well before you break a bone. In fact, DXA is the ‘Gold Standard’ used throughout the world to establish bone health status and to track changes in bone strength. IBJI’s technologists are specially trained, certified in bone densitometry, and work directly with an IBJI Rheumatologist to review, evaluate, and discuss results and treatment options.

We want to help you keep your bones as strong as they can be! To learn more, or to schedule an appointment, call the IBJI Osteoporosis Center nearest you.

Bannockburn 847-914-9096
Des Plaines 847-375-3000
Morton Grove 847-375-3000

Saturday, October 19, IBJI's Bannockburn clinic will be closed for parking lot paving. Patients needing immediate care may visit the IBJI OrthoAccess clinic at 2401 Ravine Way in Glenview. Learn more.
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