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Home |  Blog |  What’s Your Training METHOD?

What’s Your Training METHOD?

Method Testing for Endurance Athletes

At IBJI, we have an exercise assessment called “Method Testing”  which allows us to determine a unique metabolic fingerprint for each individual. The basis of metabolic testing is determining what is known as your “lactate threshold,” which is when your body begins to produce lactic acid during movement and exercise. Lactic acid is a byproduct of burning inefficient fuel in your body, which happens when you train or compete above your lactate threshold.  Fatigue onset is rapid above the lactate threshold. The accumulation of blood lactate will hinder your muscles’ ability to contract, and you will be forced to slow down or stop.

Prolonged but sustainable exercise burns fuel that is readily available and highly efficient – from fat stores. Fat stores provide the best fuel for your body, and using fat stores for energy does not produce lactic acid. Method testing pinpoints your prime metabolic zone, where your body maximizes the amount of oxygen intake, which allows for maximum performance and fat burning. It identifies the heart-rate range in which your body is working most efficiently during exercise.

The point is to learn the highest intensity at which you race and train before hitting the wall from high levels of blood lactate accumulation.

Lactate values help determine the correct training intensity to maximize your performance, and lactate values do this more accurately than heart rate alone. It allows you to get the most out of your exercise time, minimizing poor and/or inconsistent results with exercise.

How is Method Testing performed?  It requires a treadmill, step climber, or stationary bike.  We slowly increase your workload, monitor your heart rate, and test your lactic acid levels through minimally invasive blood sampling.  A unique metabolic fingerprint is generated — your metabolic fingerprint — and can be used to design a goal-specific program for you.

Whether you’re an athlete or a coach, your goal is to achieve prime sports performance.  Method Testing can help you increase your speed, strength, and endurance, recover more quickly, and prevent injury during exercise and training. To find out more about METHOD testing, click here to visit Method’s webpage. To schedule your testing with IBJI, please contact us at our Highland Park facility at (224) 765-5550.