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Home |  Blog |  Ease Arthritis Pain with Exercise

Ease Arthritis Pain with Exercise

Arthritis is a common condition that involves inflammation of one or more joints.  It’s known to be painful, and the pain will vary depending on the location, type and severity.  When pain does flare up as a result of arthritis, the last thing that comes to mind is exercise, but exercise has been proven to be a great way to ease arthritis pain and improve physical function.  A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) showed that less than 24% of arthritis patients (in the study) get the recommended minimum walking time of 150 minutes a week.

Take A Walk 

Walking is a great exercise for arthritis patients because it’s a low impact exercise that’s easy and reasonable to do. You can walk around the neighborhood, at parks, by yourself or with friends; it also doesn’t cost you anything.  Getting your exercise doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive, it just needs to be consistent.  Choose a walking plan and then commit to it.

The research by the CDC indicated that a 6 week walking routine helped to reduce pain and fatigue and increase physical function.  Of course, before starting any exercise routine, it’s best to consult with your physician, but in most cases you’ll find that your physician wants you to stay reasonably active, and that activity promotes good health.

Low Impact Exercises

Low impact exercises like walking are convenient and easy, but there are also other low impact exercises an arthritis patient may want to consider. Swimming or water exercises will definitely take more effort and planning than a walk around the block, but exercising in the water can help build endurance, increase strength and overall fitness levels. Many gyms have pools and classes taught by instructors with entire pool exercise routines. If you would like more activity than walking, speak with your physician to learn what is recommended for you specifically.

Get Relief With IBJI

Arthritis can be a very painful and debilitating condition, but counter intuitively, movement and low impact exercises like walking or swimming can help reduce pain. These physical activities are not only good for your arthritis, but good for your overall health.  Before starting any exercise routine, check with your physician and get recommendations on specific exercises.

If you are suffering from arthritis like symptoms, contact IBJI for pain relief. IBJI doctors care for over 44,000 arthritis patients a year. Find a doctor near you.