//Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

2018-06-27T10:52:10+00:00November 11th, 2017|

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis) of the Hip

Overview

Avascular necrosis of the hip, or Osteonecrosis, is the weakening and collapse of the bone in the head of your femur. This area of the bone is the ball-shaped structure that fits in the socket of your hip. As this bone gradually dies and breaks apart, painful arthritis can develop in the hip.

Causes

Avascular necrosis is caused by a problem with efficient blood circulation. Bone is a living tissue that contains its own blood vessels – and it’s this blood that allows the cells of your bones to grow and make repairs when necessary. When your bone doesn’t get the blood supply it needs and circulation is cut off, the bone cells die. Blood flow can be cut off to the head of your femur through a dislocation of the joint or if you break your hip. Blood flow is also affected by alcoholism, medications and certain medical conditions that directly involve your circulatory system.

Symptoms

At first, you may not have any symptom, however you may begin to feel gradual pain in your hip or buttocks. You may notice varying levels of pain mostly during physical activity. As pain worsens, it may hurt to stand or put weight on your hip or even when you lie down.

Treatment

In the early stages of avascular necrosis, medications, rest and physical therapy may help your symptoms and slow its progression. In the event the condition gets worse, you may need to undergo a surgical procedure. Your healthcare provider can create a plan that’s designed just for you.

Avascular Necrosis Hip Relief Near You

Hip pain may only feel like a small issue at first, but as pain gradually increases you may have a more serious condition that needs attention. You can find relief from hip pain with assistance from Illinois’ most experienced orthopedic hip specialists. If you’d like to learn about how the Illinois Bone & Joint Institute can amend your hip pain or avascular necrosis, please contact IBJI today for more information.